Theme Reflection

Digital Gallery of Networks

The 2021 Sydney University anthology is exploring the theme of 'Networks'. Networks can mean so many different things, from social connections to information technology to plants. If your struggling to figure out how to represent networks, or need a place to start, have a look at a collection of photography, all exploring the theme of networks in different ways.

Social Networks and How They Shape Our Lives

The concept of networks has been explored in some of the Anthology’s previous blogs, however my interest in networks is more firmly rooted in our own personal, societal networks and how they affect our lives on a deeper level. This subject, however, is wide reaching, so throughout this blog I aim to dive into some of the core aspects of human networks and the part they play in our lives.

Friends sitting around a table working on a project

Personal Networks and Identity – Writing Prompt

We have previously shared writing prompts that delved into some less common kinds of networks that might get you thinking outside the box. If you’re looking for something different to spark your creativity, let’s think about some types of social networks and how they might affect our sense of self-identity.

Feeling Disconnected in a Connected World – Writing Prompt

When you're thinking about what to write for this years anthology on the theme 'Networks', think about what social media and technology has done to our society. Has social media and smart phones brought us closer together? Or torn us apart?

What is a network? Thinking outside the box

This year, the Sydney University Anthology is asking staff, students, and alumni to reflect on the theme of ‘networks’. This is a broad concept that will be interpreted in different ways by different people. For many of us, the term ‘networks’ brings to mind social connections, whether ‘networking’ for business, or communicating with friends via social media. Many fields have their own unique understandings of networks: network analysis in anthropology, neural networks in artificial intelligence, network addresses and nodes in computing. We encourage you to bring your own interpretation of this year’s theme to your stories, essays, poetry and visual art. To get you thinking about some of the many ways to approach the anthology’s theme, here are three alternative kinds of ‘networks’ you might want to consider.

Thinking About Networks

In this years’ student anthology project, we want you to flex your creativity in exploring the idea of networks and what they mean to you. Get thinking about some unique ways networks operate across the world on a global scale and on a smaller, more personal level. Here are some creative prompts to get you inspired about the different interpretations of networks.

Q&A with ‘All for a Promise’ author Vrishali Jain

Vrishali Jain is a talented writer who has written for the last two anthologies and for various radio channels in India. Originally from Kanpur, India, she now calls Sydney home, busily working as a producer at SBS Hindi. 'All for a promise' is an inspiring tale of a community-led tree conservation movement in New Delhi. Her story chronicles the courageous women who fought against the destruction of the forests. The Chipko movement became well known for the peaceful protest, of women creating physical barriers and hugging the trees.

Q&A with Charlotte Lim

Charlotte Lim is an advocate of climate justice and animal rights. She spends her spare time volunteering at NSW Hen Rescue, an animal sanctuary dedicated to the liberation of all animals, especially caged hens.

Q&A with ‘Earth-Cry’ author Hannah Roux

Hannah is a poetry writer, studying English literature at Sydney University. She believe that the world is sacred, and it is our human duty to preserve and guard it as its stewards. The poems she has submitted in this years anthology are about that duty.

The Weight of Inevitability

What does it mean for something to be ‘inevitable’? We know that the sun will rise each day and set each night (until millions of years from now when it inevitably doesn’t). We know that if you’re working in a group project, there’ll inevitably be someone who doesn’t pull their weight. We know that scientists are making predictions that sea ice will retreat to a small fringe by 2040, polar bear populations will decline by more than 30% in the next 35-40 years, and our world’s temperature will increase by more than 2° Celsius.